The Old Rectory of Fisherford- Drawing & Finishing Touches

The Old Rectory of Fisherford- Drawing & Finishing Touches

-

The Old Rectory Jamie Cameron Drawing

-

In the last posting we looked at the planning stages: meeting the client, coming up with the layout, and deciding on a final composition to go with...

-

In this post, we'll have a look at the actual work of the drawing itself, and the steps along the way.

-

Main Bulk of the Drawing- Ink Work

-

The Old Rectory Jamie Cameron Drawing

-

Having settled on a layout that t he client was happy with, it was time to make a start and flesh out the drawing... The view chosen was a nice front-on view of the Facade of the Rectory, which also captures the main frontage of the church with its beautiful stained glass windows. I had in mind an interesting way to approach these jewel-like windows in the back of my mind, but the first step was to fill out the main details such as the building forms, door and window openings, slate lines, chimneys and brick courses. This is, I have to admit, the more laborious part in terms of planning, as you are constantly going back and forth, checking and double-checking things against the reference photos, the drawing board, visual clues, and basically making sure all the details tally together in the right way. -

As a each photograph is unique, it means in order to get the ratios right you must adjust the scale to suit the size of the photo, so it matches the scale you are drawing the building at. This means I can work from any photo and still the window or door should be the same shape and ratio. Different photos are useful in different ways too, and sometimes that side angle closeup will capture something different that shows it in a different light, so I always say that there is no such thing as too much reference!

-

Here are a few shots of the drawing progressing:

-

The Old Rectory Jamie Cameron Drawing

-

The Old Rectory Jamie Cameron Drawing

-

The Old Rectory Jamie Cameron Drawing

-

The Old Rectory Jamie Cameron Drawing

-

The Old Rectory Jamie Cameron Drawing

-

The Old Rectory Jamie Cameron Drawing

-

A Few Thoughts on 'Artistic License'

-

Customers and colleagues often ask my thoughts on artistic license, and this piece is an interesting place to mention a bit about what it is, and how it can be used. A lot of people probably have different ideas about what the term actually means, and doubtless every artist will have their own interpretation of it. Being trained as an architect I think my use of it could probably be thought of as 'minimal'. although I'd like to expand on that bit.

-

While it's true that I do spend a lot of time in working out the details, and have a very technical approach especially in the layout of the composition and the finer details, it doesn't mean that I am only setting out to create a carbon copy of the way the building is in real life- if that were true, then a photograph would do it much better than a drawing ever could! In capturing a building in the way I do the aim I think is always to balance technical accuracy with 'character accuracy': I like to spend as much time in capturing the feel and surroundings of the place as well as the building, as in many cases it is the surroundings which make the place special, just as much as the building itself.

-

At a micro scale, for example in the drawing of a slate roof, I like to try and capture the individual undulations of an old roof- often it will sag by a minute amount between the rafters, and where there are dormers or velux windows the slates will rise ever so slightly at the edge, where there are more flashings and membranes underneath. It's exactly the same with brickwork, doors, sash windows, vegetation, and every other aspect of a drawing. In a new build house, I might tend more towards a more exact approach, and even show the plants in a very 'regimented' way to complement the overall style, whereas in a rambling old home I want every aspect of the piece to contribute to that feeling of ease and softness that old buildings have...

-

So all in all I think it is a balancing act that has to be tailored to the style of drawing you are aiming for, and without a doubt artistic license is something that each person should use in their own way.

-

In this piece, it was very much the softer charm I was after, and you will see that eve the white rendered surface of the Rectory has slight variations and shadows, as the surface is not a perfectly flat plane. In the Church, the ruined stonework presents a beautiful contrast to this white frontage, and the shadows around the stonework is extra pronounced where some of the mortar has come out over the years. The two buildings, while similar in some ways, still contrast with each other beautifully.

-

To Colour or Not to Colour- THAT is the question!

-

The Old Rectory Jamie Cameron Drawing 

-

With the bulk of the drawing complete, and the planting and surrounding details almost there, my thoughts turned to colour- I mentioned before that I had in the back of my mind a way to approach the jewel-like Church windows (which still remained miraculously intact!), and the solution liked in a drawing I completed with very similar aspects- that of Trinity Hall in Aberdeen, home of the Seven Incorporated Trades.

-

Trinity Hall is a 1970s Brutalist style of building with a rough concrete finish, but the heart of the building has to be the original windows which capture the trades in the emerald like colours of a Church, and elevate them to similar grandeur! In this drawing I decided to make everything black and white, EXCEPT those windows which are picked out in bright ink.

-

I decided to use the same approach with these beautiful windows, and here is the result:

-

The Old Rectory Jamie Cameron Drawing

-

The Old Rectory Jamie Cameron Drawing

-

 

Finishing Touches & Personal Details

-

This being such a personal commission, I was keen to make it as special as possible, and capture everything that the client wanted; when we met, I had shown her a few pieces where I had used just a dash of colour over the planting and vegetation to bring it to life, as in this piece of the Marcliffe, and she was keen for me try something similar, as she had a beautiful, well tended garden:

-

Marcliffe Hotel Drawing Stewart Spence Jamie Cameron

-

Originally I had concerns, as I was worried that the colour would overshadow the colouring in the Church windows and detract from it, but in fact I was over worrying the point- the Church windows were dark enough to remain the focal point, while the white facade of the Rectory part were actually contrasted very nicely by a dash of colouring in the garden! Just the slightest dash:

-

The Old Rectory Jamie Cameron Drawing

 -

A few other personal touches were the title, which is in a nice cursive script chosen by the client, and her pet cat, Cheewee, who is sitting somewhere in the scene- see if you can find him!

-

Presentation and Framing

-

 The Old Rectory Jamie Cameron Drawing

-

With the drawing complete, it was time to get it framed up- the client in this case chose a very nice frame I have often used- a traditional black moulded one, with a light grey mountboard with white groove around the edge. 

-

On delivering the final piece to her in her new home, she was delighted with the end result, and from the photos of it on the wall it not only complements her interiors but will serve as a nice conversation starter, and constant memento of the Old Rectory:

-

The Old Rectory Jamie Cameron Drawing

 -

The Old Rectory Jamie Cameron Drawing

 -

The Old Rectory Jamie Cameron Drawing

-

I just wanted to say than you once again to Gillian for commissioning me to create this piece- it turned out far more captivating than even I would have expected, and her choices of text and colour were things which contributed not only to a beautiful piece, but also a very personal one.

Thanks again!

-

 

- - - - -

If you would like to get in touch about a drawing idea of your own house, or have any questions about this piece I would love to hear your thoughts.
Phone: 07804 669082
Follow me on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter on the links below, and if you enjoyed this blog, please like and share!
-
 

 

 

 

 


Share this post


Leave a comment

Note, comments must be approved before they are published